The End of Physics

A young researcher, Oliver Consa, managed to solve a complicated integral: he gave us an accurate calculation of the anomalous magnetic moment based on a (semi-)classical model. Here is the link to his paper, and this is the link to my first-order approach. I admit: he was first. Truth doesn’t need an author. 🙂

This is a great achievement. We now have an electron model that explains all of the mysterious ‘intrinsic’ properties of the electron. It also explains the interference of an electron with itself. Most importantly, the so-called ‘precision test of QED’ (the theoretical and experimental value of the anomalous magnetic moment) also gets a ‘common-sense’ interpretation now. Bye-bye QFT!

So now it’s time for the next step(s). If you have followed this blog, then you know I have a decent photon model too – and other researchers – most are small names but there are one or two big names as well 🙂 – are working to refine it.

The End of Physics is near. Mankind knows everything now. Sadly, this doesn’t solve any of the major issues mankind is struggling with (think of inequality and climate change here). :-/

Post scriptum: When you check the references, it would seem that Consa borrowed a lot of material from the 1990 article he mentions as a reference: David L. Bergman and J. Paul Wesley, Spinning Charged Ring Model of Electron Yielding Anomalous Magnetic Moment, Galilean Electrodynamics, Vol. 1, Sept-Oct 1990, pp. 63–67). It is strange that David Hestenes hadn’t noted this article, because it goes back to the same era during which he tried to launch the Zitterbewegung interpretation of quantum physics ! I really find it very bizarre to see how all these elements for a realist interpretation of quantum physics have been lying around for many decades now. I guess it’s got to do with what Sean Carroll suggested in his 7 Sept 2019 opinion article in the NY Times: mainstream physicists do not want to understand quantum mechanics.

A common-sense interpretation of (quantum) physics

This is my summary of what I refer to as a common-sense interpretation of quantum physics. It’s a rather abstruse summary of the 40 papers I wrote over the last two years.

1. A force acts on a charge. The electromagnetic force acts on an electric charge (there is no separate magnetic charge) and the strong force acts on a strong charge. A charge is a charge: a pointlike ‘thing’ with zero rest mass. The idea of an electron combines the idea of a charge and its motion (Schrödinger’s Zitterbewegung). The electron’s rest mass is the equivalent mass of the energy in its motion (mass without mass). The elementary wavefunction represents this motion.

2. There is no weak force: a force theory explaining why charges stay together must also explain when and how they separate. A force works through a force field: the idea that forces are mediated by virtual messenger particles resembles 19th century aether theory. The fermion-boson dichotomy does not reflect anything real: we have charged and non-charged wavicles (electrons versus photons, for example).

3. The Planck-Einstein law embodies a (stable) wavicle. A stable wavicle respects the Planck-Einstein relation (E = hf) and Einstein’s mass-energy equivalence relation (E = m·c2). A wavicle will, therefore, carry energy but it will also pack one or more units of Planck’s quantum of action. Planck’s quantum of action represents an elementary cycle in Nature. An elementary particle embodies the idea of an elementary cycle.

4. The ‘particle zoo’ is a collection of unstable wavicles: they disintegrate because their cycle is slightly off (the integral of the force over the distance of the loop and over the cycle time is not exactly equal to h).

5. An electron is a wavicle that carries charge. A photon does not carry charge: it carries energy between wavicle systems (atoms, basically). It can do so because it is an oscillating field.

6. An atom is a wavicle system. A wavicle system has an equilibrium energy state. This equilibrium state packs one unit of h. Higher energy states pack two, three,…, n units of h. When an atom transitions from one energy state to another, it will emit or absorb a photon that (i) carries the energy difference between the two energy states and (ii) packs one unit of h.

7. Nucleons (protons and neutrons) are held together because of a strong force. The strong force acts on a strong charge, for which we need to define a new unit: we choose the dirac but – out of respect for Yukawa, we write one dirac as 1 Y. If Yukawa’s function models the strong force correctly, then the strong force – which we denote as FN – can be calculated from the Yukawa potential:

F1

This function includes a scale parameter a and a nuclear proportionality constant υ0. Besides its function as an (inverse) mathematical proportionality constant, it also ensures the physical dimensions on the left- and the right-hand side of the force equation are the same. We can choose to equate the numerical value of υ0 to one.

8. The nuclear force attracts two positive electric charges. The electrostatic force repels them. These two forces are equal at a distance r = a. The strong charge unit (gN) can, therefore, be calculated. It is equal to:

F2

9. Nucleons (protons or neutrons) carry both electric as well as strong charge (qe and gN). A kinematic model disentangling both has not yet been found. Such model should explain the magnetic moment of protons and neutrons.

10. We think of a nucleus as wavicle system too. When going from one energy state to another, the nucleus emits or absorbs neutrinos. Hence, we think of the neutrino as the photon of the strong force. Such changes in energy states may also involve the emission and/or absorption of an electric charge (an electron or a positron).

Does this make sense? I look forward to your thoughts. 🙂

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Because the above is all very serious, I thought it would be good to add something that will make you smile. 🙂

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