Playing with amplitudes

Let’s play a bit with the stuff we found in our previous post. This is going to be unconventional, or experimental, if you want. The idea is to give you… Well… Some ideas. So you can play yourself. 🙂 Let’s go.

Let’s first look at Feynman’s (simplified) formula for the amplitude of a photon to go from point a to point b. If we identify point by the position vector r1 and point by the position vector r2, and using Dirac’s fancy bra-ket notation, then it’s written as:

propagator

So we have a vector dot product here: pr12 = |p|∙|r12|· cosθ = p∙r12·cosα. The angle here (α) is the angle between the and r12 vector. All good. Well… No. We’ve got a problem. When it comes to calculating probabilities, the α angle doesn’t matter: |ei·θ/r|2 = 1/r2. Hence, for the probability, we get: P = | 〈r2|r1〉 |2 = 1/r122. Always ! Now that’s strange. The θ = pr12/ħ argument gives us a different phase depending on the angle (α) between p and r12. But… Well… Think of it: cosα goes from 1 to 0 when α goes from 0 to ±90° and, of course, is negative when p and r12 have opposite directions but… Well… According to this formula, the probabilities do not depend on the direction of the momentum. That’s just weird, I think. Did Feynman, in his iconic Lectures, give us a meaningless formula?

Maybe. We may also note this function looks like the elementary wavefunction for any particle, which we wrote as:

ψ(x, t) = a·e−i∙θ = a·e−i(E∙t − px)/ħ= a·ei(E∙t)/ħ·ei(px)/ħ

The only difference is that the 〈r2|r1〉 sort of abstracts away from time, so… Well… Let’s get a feel for the quantities. Let’s think of a photon carrying some typical amount of energy. Hence, let’s talk visible light and, therefore, photons of a few eV only – say 5.625 eV = 5.625×1.6×10−19 J = 9×10−19 J. Hence, their momentum is equal to p = E/c = (9×10−19 N·m)/(3×105 m/s) = 3×10−24 N·s. That’s tiny but that’s only because newtons and seconds are enormous units at the (sub-)atomic scale. As for the distance, we may want to use the thickness of a playing card as a starter, as that’s what Young used when establishing the experimental fact of light interfering with itself. Now, playing cards in Young’s time were obviously rougher than those today, but let’s take the smaller distance: modern cards are as thin as 0.3 mm. Still, that distance is associated with a value of θ that is equal to 13.6 million. Hence, the density of our wavefunction is enormous at this scale, and it’s a bit of a miracle that Young could see any interference at all ! As shown in the table below, we only get meaningful values (remember: θ is a phase angle) when we go down to the nanometer scale (10−9 m) or, even better, the angstroms scale ((10−9 m). table action

So… Well… Again: what can we do with Feynman’s formula? Perhaps he didn’t give us a propagator function but something that is more general (read: more meaningful) at our (limited) level of knowledge. As I’ve been reading Feynman for quite a while now – like three or four years 🙂 – I think… Well… Yes. That’s it. Feynman wants us to think about it. 🙂 Are you joking again, Mr. Feynman? 🙂 So let’s assume the reasonable thing: let’s assume it gives us the amplitude to go from point a to point by the position vector along some path r. So, then, in line with what we wrote in our previous post, let’s say p·r (momentum over a distance) is the action (S) we’d associate with this particular path (r) and then see where we get. So let’s write the formula like this:

ψ = a·ei·θ = (1/rei·S = ei·p∙r/r

We’ll use an index to denote the various paths: r0 is the straight-line path and ri is any (other) path. Now, quantum mechanics tells us we should calculate this amplitude for every possible path. The illustration below shows the straight-line path and two nearby paths. So each of these paths is associated with some amount of action, which we measure in Planck units: θ = S/ħalternative paths

The time interval is given by = tr0/c, for all paths. Why is the time interval the same for all paths? Because we think of a photon going from some specific point in space and in time to some other specific point in space and in time. Indeed, when everything is said and done, we do think of light as traveling from point a to point at the speed of light (c). In fact, all of the weird stuff here is all about trying to explain how it does that. 🙂

Now, if we would think of the photon actually traveling along this or that path, then this implies its velocity along any of the nonlinear paths will be larger than c, which is OK. That’s just the weirdness of quantum mechanics, and you should actually not think of the photon actually traveling along one of these paths anyway although we’ll often put it that way. Think of something fuzzier, whatever that may be. 🙂

So the action is energy times time, or momentum times distance. Hence, the difference in action between two paths and j is given by:

δ= p·rj − p·ri = p·(rj − ri) = p·Δr

I’ll explain the δS < ħ/3 thing in a moment. Let’s first pause and think about the uncertainty and how we’re modeling it. We can effectively think of the variation in as some uncertainty in the action: δ= ΔS = p·Δr. However, if S is also equal to energy times time (= E·t), and we insist is the same for all paths, then we must have some uncertainty in the energy, right? Hence, we can write δas ΔS = ΔE·t. But, of course, E = E = m·c2 = p·c, so we will have an uncertainty in the momentum as well. Hence, the variation in should be written as:

δ= ΔS = Δp·Δr

That’s just logical thinking: if we, somehow, entertain the idea of a photon going from some specific point in spacetime to some other specific point in spacetime along various paths, then the variation, or uncertainty, in the action will effectively combine some uncertainty in the momentum and the distance. We can calculate Δp as ΔE/c, so we get the following:

δ= ΔS = Δp·Δr = ΔE·Δr/c = ΔE·Δt with ΔtΔr/c

So we have the two expressions for the Uncertainty Principle here: ΔS = Δp·Δr = ΔE·Δt. Just be careful with the interpretation of Δt: it’s just the equivalent of Δr. We just express the uncertainty in distance in seconds using the (absolute) speed of light. We are not changing our spacetime interval: we’re still looking at a photon going from to in seconds, exactly. Let’s now look at the δS < ħ/3 thing. If we’re adding two amplitudes (two arrows or vectors, so to speak) and we want the magnitude of the result to be larger than the magnitude of the two contributions, then the angle between them should be smaller than 120 degrees, so that’s 2π/3 rad. The illustration below shows how you can figure that out geometrically.angles 2Hence, if S0 is the action for r0, then S1 = S0 + ħ and S2 = S0 + 2·ħ are still good, but S3 = S0 + 3·ħ is not good. Why? Because the difference in the phase angles is Δθ = S1/ħ − S0/ħ = (S0 + ħ)/ħ − S0/ħ = 1 and Δθ = S2/ħ − S0/ħ = (S0 + 2·ħ)/ħ − S0/ħ = 2 respectively, so that’s 57.3° and 114.6° respectively and that’s, effectively, less than 120°. In contrast, for the next path, we find that Δθ = S3/ħ − S0/ħ = (S0 + 3·ħ)/ħ − S0/ħ = 3, so that’s 171.9°. So that amplitude gives us a negative contribution.

Let’s do some calculations using a spreadsheet. To simplify things, we will assume we measure everything (time, distance, force, mass, energy, action,…) in Planck units. Hence, we can simply write: Sn = S0 + n. Of course, = 1, 2,… etcetera, right? Well… Maybe not. We are measuring action in units of ħ, but do we actually think action comes in units of ħ? I am not sure. It would make sense, intuitively, but… Well… There’s uncertainty on the energy (E) and the momentum (p) of our photon, right? And how accurately can we measure the distance? So there’s some randomness everywhere. 😦 So let’s leave that question open as for now.

We will also assume that the phase angle for S0 is equal to 0 (or some multiple of 2π, if you want). That’s just a matter of choosing the origin of time. This makes it really easy: ΔSn = Sn − S0 = n, and the associated phase angle θn = Δθn is the same. In short, the amplitude for each path reduces to ψn = ei·n/r0. So we need to add these first and then calculate the magnitude, which we can then square to get a probability. Of course, there is also the issue of normalization (probabilities have to add up to one) but let’s tackle that later. For the calculations, we use Euler’s r·ei·θ = r·(cosθ + i·sinθ) = r·cosθ + i·r·sinθ formula. Needless to say, |r·ei·θ|2 = |r|2·|ei·θ|2 = |r|2·(cos2θ + sin2θ) = r. Finally, when adding complex numbers, we add the real and imaginary parts respectively, and we’ll denote the ψ0 + ψ1 +ψ2 + … sum as Ψ.

Now, we also need to see how our ΔS = Δp·Δr works out. We may want to assume that the uncertainty in p and in r will both be proportional to the overall uncertainty in the action. For example, we could try writing the following: ΔSn = Δpn·Δrn = n·Δp1·Δr1. It also makes sense that you may want Δpn and Δrn to be proportional to Δp1 and Δr1 respectively. Combining both, the assumption would be this:

Δpn = √n·Δpand Δrn = √n·Δr1

So now we just need to decide how we will distribute ΔS1 = ħ = 1 over Δp1 and Δr1 respectively. For example, if we’d assume Δp1 = 1, then Δr1 = ħ/Δp1 = 1/1 = 1. These are the calculations. I will let you analyze them. 🙂newnewWell… We get a weird result. It reminds me of Feynman’s explanation of the partial reflection of light, shown below, but… Well… That doesn’t make much sense, does it?

partial reflection

Hmm… Maybe it does. 🙂 Look at the graph more carefully. The peaks sort of oscillate out so… Well… That might make sense… 🙂

Does it? Are we doing something wrong here? These amplitudes should reflect the ones that are reflected in those nice animations (like this one, for example, which is part of that’s part of the Wikipedia article on Feynman’s path integral formulation of quantum mechanics). So what’s wrong, if anything? Well… Our paths differ by some fixed amount of action, which doesn’t quite reflect the geometric approach that’s used in those animations. The graph below shows how the distance varies as a function of ngeometry

If we’d use a model in which the distance would increase linearly or, preferably, exponentially, then we’d get the result we want to get, right?

Well… Maybe. Let’s try it. Hmm… We need to think about the geometry here. Look at the triangle below. triangle sideIf is the straight-line path (r0), then ac could be one of the crooked paths (rn). To simplify, we’ll assume isosceles triangles, so equals c and, hence, rn = 2·a = 2·c. We will also assume the successive paths are separated by the same vertical distance (h = h1) right in the middle, so hb = hn = n·h1. It is then easy to show the following:r formulaThis gives the following graph for rn = 10 and h= 0.01.r graph

Is this the right step increase? Not sure. We can vary the values in our spreadsheet. Let’s first build it. The photon will have to travel faster in order to cover the extra distance in the same time, so its momentum will be higher. Let’s think about the velocity. Let’s start with the first path (= 1). In order to cover the extra distance Δr1, the velocity c1 must be equal to (r0 + Δr1)/= r0/+ Δr1/t = + Δr1/= c0 + Δr1/t. We can write c1 as c1 = c0 + Δc1, so Δc1 = Δr1/t. Now, the ratio of p1  and p0 will be equal to the ratio of c1 and c0 because p1/p= (mc1)/mc0) = c1/c0. Hence, we have the following formula for p1:

p1 = p0·c1/c0 = p0·(c0 + Δc1)/c0 = p0·[1 + Δr1/(c0·t) = p0·(1 + Δr1/r0)

For pn, the logic is the same, so we write:

pn = p0·cn/c0 = p0·(c0 + Δcn)/c0 = p0·[1 + Δrn/(c0·t) = p0·(1 + Δrn/r0)

Let’s do the calculations, and let’s use meaningful values, so the nanometer scale and actual values for Planck’s constant and the photon momentum. The results are shown below. original

Pretty interesting. In fact, this looks really good. The probability first swings around wildly, because of these zones of constructive and destructive interference, but then stabilizes. [Of course, I would need to normalize the probabilities, but you get the idea, right?] So… Well… I think we get a very meaningful result with this model. Sweet ! 🙂 I’m lovin’ it ! 🙂 And, here you go, this is (part of) the calculation table, so you can see what I am doing. 🙂newnew

The graphs below look even better: I just changed the h1/r0 ratio from 1/100 to 1/10. The probability stabilizes almost immediately. 🙂 So… Well… It’s not as fancy as the referenced animation, but I think the educational value of this thing here is at least as good ! 🙂great

🙂 This is good stuff… 🙂

Post scriptum (19 September 2017): There is an obvious inconsistency in the model above, and in the calculations. We assume there is a path r1 = , r2, r2,etcetera, and then we calculate the action for it, and the amplitude, and then we add the amplitude to the sum. But, surely, we should count these paths twice, in two-dimensional space, that is. Think of the graph: we have positive and negative interference zones that are sort of layered around the straight-line path, as shown below.zones

In three-dimensional space, these lines become surfaces. Hence, rather than adding one arrow for every δ  having one contribution only, we may want to add… Well… In three-dimensional space, the formula for the surface around the straight-line path would probably look like π·hn·r1, right? Hmm… Interesting idea. I changed my spreadsheet to incorporate that idea, and I got the graph below. It’s a nonsensical result, because the probability does swing around, but it gradually spins out of control: it never stabilizes.revisedThat’s because we increase the weight of the paths that are further removed from the center. So… Well… We shouldn’t be doing that, I guess. 🙂 I’ll you look for the right formula, OK? Let me know when you found it. 🙂

The Complementarity Principle

Unlike what you might think when seeing the title of this post, it is not my intention to enter into philosophical discussions here: many authors have been writing about this ‘principle’, most of which–according to eminent physicists–don’t know what they are talking about. So I have no intention to make a fool of myself here too. However, what I do want to do here is explore, in an intuitive way, how the classical and quantum-mechanical explanations of the phenomenon of the diffraction of light are different from each other–and fundamentally so–while, necessarily, having to yield the same predictions. It is in that sense that the two explanations should be ‘complementary’.

The classical explanation

I’ve done a fairly complete analysis of the classical explanation in my posts on Diffraction and the Uncertainty Principle (20 and 21 September), so I won’t dwell on that here. Let me just repeat the basics. The model is based on the so-called Huygens-Fresnel Principle, according to which each point in the slit becomes a source of a secondary spherical wave. These waves then interfere, constructively or destructively, and, hence, by adding them, we get the form of the wave at each point of time and at each point in space behind the slit. The animation below illustrates the idea. However, note that the mathematical analysis does not assume that the point sources are neatly separated from each other: instead of only six point sources, we have an infinite number of them and, hence, adding up the waves amounts to solving some integral (which, as you know, is an infinite sum).

Huygens_Fresnel_Principle

We know what we are supposed to get: a diffraction pattern. The intensity of the light on the screen at the other side depends on (1) the slit width (d), (2) the frequency of the light (λ), and (3) the angle of incidence (θ), as shown below.

Single_Slit_Diffraction_(english)

One point to note is that we have smaller bumps left and right. We don’t get that if we’d treat the slit as a single point source only, like Feynman does when he discusses the double-slit experiment for (physical) waves. Indeed, look at the image below: each of the slits acts as one point source only and, hence, the intensity curves I1 and I2 do not show a diffraction pattern. They are just nice Gaussian “bell” curves, albeit somewhat adjusted because of the angle of incidence (we have two slits above and below the center, instead of just one on the normal itself). So we have an interference pattern on the screen and, now that we’re here, let me be clear on terminology: I am going along with the widespread definition of diffraction being a pattern created by one slit, and the definition of interference as a pattern created by two or more slits. I am noting this just to make sure there’s no confusion.

Water waves

That should be clear enough. Let’s move on the quantum-mechanical explanation.

The quantum-mechanical explanation

There are several formulations of quantum mechanics: you’ve heard about matrix mechanics and wave mechanics. Roughly speaking, in matrix mechanics “we interpret the physical properties of particles as matrices that evolve in time”, while the wave mechanics approach is primarily based on these complex-valued wave functions–one for each physical property (e.g. position, momentum, energy). Both approaches are mathematically equivalent.

There is also a third approach, which is referred to as the path integral formulation, which  “replaces the classical notion of a single, unique trajectory for a system with a sum, or functional integral, over an infinity of possible trajectories to compute an amplitude” (all definitions here were taken from Wikipedia). This approach is associated with Richard Feynman but can also be traced back to Paul Dirac, like most of the math involved in quantum mechanics, it seems. It’s this approach which I’ll try to explain–again, in an intuitive way only–in order to show the two explanations should effectively lead to the same predictions.

The key to understanding the path integral formulation is the assumption that a particle–and a ‘particle’ may refer to both bosons (e.g. photons) or fermions (e.g. electrons)–can follow any path from point A to B, as illustrated below. Each of these paths is associated with a (complex-valued) probability amplitude, and we have to add all these probability amplitudes to arrive at the probability amplitude for the particle to move from A to B.

615px-Three_paths_from_A_to_B

You can find great animations illustrating what it’s all about in the relevant Wikipedia article but, because I can’t upload video here, I’ll just insert two illustrations from Feynman’s 1985 QED, in which he does what I try to do, and that is to approach the topic intuitively, i.e. without too much mathematical formalism. So probability amplitudes are just ‘arrows’ (with a length and a direction, just like a complex number or a vector), and finding the resultant or final arrow is a matter of just adding all the little arrows to arrive at one big arrow, which is the probability amplitude, which he denotes as P(A, B), as shown below.

feynman-qed-1985

This intuitive approach is great and actually goes a very long way in explaining complicated phenomena, such as iridescence for example (the wonderful patterns of color on an oil film!), or the partial reflection of light by glass (anything between 0 and 16%!). All his tricks make sense. For example, different frequencies are interpreted as slower or faster ‘stopwatches’ and, as such, they determine the final direction of the arrows which, in turn, explains why blue and red light are reflected differently. And so on and son. It all works. […] Up to a point.

Indeed, Feynman does get in trouble when trying to explain diffraction. I’ve reproduced his explanation below. The key to the argument is the following:

  1. If we have a slit that’s very wide, there are a lot of possible paths for the photon to take. However, most of these paths cancel each other out, and so that’s why the photon is likely to travel in a straight line. Let me quote Feynman: “When the gap between the blocks is wide enough to allow many neighboring paths to P and Q, the arrows for the paths to P add up (because all the paths to P take nearly the same time), while the paths to Q cancel out (because those paths have a sizable difference in time). So the photomultiplier at Q doesn’t click.” (QED, p.54)
  2. However, “when the gap is nearly closed and there are only a few neighboring paths, the arrows to Q also add up, because there is hardly any difference in time between them, either (see Fig. 34). Of course, both final arrows are small, so there’s not much light either way through such a small hole, but the detector at Q clicks almost as much as the one at P! So when you try to squeeze light too much to make sure it’s going only in a straight line, it refuses to cooperate and begins to spread out.” (QED, p. 55)

Many arrowsFew arrows

This explanation is as simple and intuitive as Feynman’s ‘explanation’ of diffraction using the Uncertainty Principle in his introductory chapter on quantum mechanics (Lectures, I-38-2), which is illustrated below. I won’t go into the detail (I’ve done that before) but you should note that, just like the explanation above, such explanations do not explain the secondary, tertiary etc bumps in the diffraction pattern.

Diffraction of electrons

So what’s wrong with these explanations? Nothing much. They’re simple and intuitive, but essentially incomplete, because they do not incorporate all of the math involved in interference. Incorporating the math means doing these integrals for

  1. Electromagnetic waves in classical mechanics: here we are talking ‘wave functions’ with some real-valued amplitude representing the strength of the electric and magnetic field; and
  2. Probability waves: these are complex-valued functions, with the complex-valued amplitude representing probability amplitudes.

The two should, obviously, yield the same result, but a detailed comparison between the approaches is quite complicated, it seems. Now, I’ve googled a lot of stuff, and I duly note that diffraction of electromagnetic waves (i.e. light) is conveniently analyzed by summing up complex-valued waves too, and, moreover, they’re of the same familiar type: ψ = Aei(kx–ωt). However, these analyses also duly note that it’s only the real part of the wave that has an actual physical interpretation, and that it’s only because working with natural exponentials (addition, multiplication, integration, derivation, etc) is much easier than working with sine and cosine waves that such complex-valued wave functions are used (also) in classical mechanics. In fact, note the fine print in Feynman’s illustration of interference of physical waves (Fig. 37-2): he calculates the intensities I1 and I2 by taking the square of the absolute amplitudes ĥ1 and ĥ2, and the hat indicates that we’re also talking some complex-valued wave function here.

Hence, we must be talking the same mathematical waves in both explanations, aren’t we? In other words, we should get the same psi functions ψ = Aei(kx–ωt) in both explanations, don’t we? Well… Maybe. But… Probably not. As far as I know–but I must be wrong–we cannot just re-normalize the E and B vectors in these electromagnetic waves in order to establish an equivalence with probability waves. I haven’t seen that being done (but I readily admit I still have a lot of reading to do) and so I must assume it’s not very clear-cut at all.

So what? Well… I don’t know. So far, I did not find a ‘nice’ or ‘intuitive’ explanation of a quantum-mechanical approach to the phenomenon of diffraction yielding the same grand diffraction equation, referred to as the Fresnel-Kirchoff diffraction formula (see below), or one of its more comprehensible (because simplified) representations, such as the Fraunhofer diffraction formula, or the even easier formula which I used in my own post (you can google them: they’re somewhat less monstrous and–importantly–they work with real numbers only, which makes them easier to understand).

Kirchoff formula[…] That looks pretty daunting, isn’t it? You may start to understand it a bit better by noting that (n, r) and (n, s) are angles, so that’s OK in a cosine function. The other variables also have fairly standard interpretations, as shown below, but… Admit it: ‘easy’ is something else, isn’t it?

730px-Kirchhoff_1

So… Where are we here? Well… As said, I trust that both explanations are mathematically equivalent – just like matrix and wave mechanics 🙂 –and, hence, that a quantum-mechanical analysis will indeed yield the same formula. However, I think I’ll only understand physics truly if I’ve gone through all of the motions here.

Well then… I guess that should be some kind of personal benchmark that should guide me on this journey, isn’t it? 🙂 I’ll keep you posted.

Post scriptum: To be fair to Feynman, and demonstrating his talent as a teacher once again, he actually acknowledges that the double-slit thought experiment uses simplified assumptions that do not include diffraction effects when the electrons go through the slit(s). He does so, however, only in one of the first chapters of Vol. III of the Lectures, where he comes back to the experiment to further discuss the first principles of quantum mechanics. I’ll just quote him: “Incidentally, we are going to suppose that the holes 1 and 2 are small enough that when we say an electron goes through the hole, we don’t have to discuss which part of the hole. We could, of course, split each hole into pieces with a certain amplitude that the electron goes to the top of the hole and the bottom of the hole and so on. We will suppose that the hole is small enough so that we don’t have to worry about this detail. That is part of the roughness involved; the matter can be made more precise, but we don’t want to do so at this stage.” So here he acknowledges that he omitted the intricacies of diffraction. I noted this only later. Sorry.

Diffraction and the Uncertainty Principle (I)

In his Lectures, Feynman advances the double-slit experiment with electrons as the textbook example explaining the “mystery” of quantum mechanics. It shows interference–a property of waves–of ‘particles’, electrons: they no longer behave as particles in this experiment. While it obviously illustrates “the basic peculiarities of quantum mechanics” very well, I think the dual behavior of light – as a wave and as a stream of photons – is at least as good as an illustration. And he could also have elaborated the phenomenon of electron diffraction.

Indeed, the phenomenon of diffraction–light, or an electron beam, interfering with itself as it goes through one slit only–is equally fascinating. Frankly, I think it does not get enough attention in textbooks, including Feynman’s, so that’s why I am devoting a rather long post to it here.

To be fair, Feynman does use the phenomenon of diffraction to illustrate the Uncertainty Principle, both in his Lectures as well as in that little marvel, QED: The Strange Theory of Light of Matter–a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the (probability) wave function concept without any reference to complex numbers or what have you. Let’s have a look at it: light going through a slit or circular aperture, illustrated in the left-hand image below, creates a diffraction pattern, which resembles the interference pattern created by an array of oscillators, as shown in the right-hand image.

Diffraction for particle wave Line of oscillators

Let’s start with the right-hand illustration, which illustrates interference, not diffraction. We have eight point sources of electromagnetic radiation here (e.g. radio waves, but it can also be higher-energy light) in an array of length L. λ is the wavelength of the radiation that is being emitted, and α is the so-called intrinsic relative phase–or, to put it simply, the phase difference. We assume α is zero here, so the array produces a maximum in the direction θout = 0, i.e. perpendicular to the array. There are also weaker side lobes. That’s because the distance between the array and the point where we are measuring the intensity of the emitted radiation does result in a phase difference, even if the oscillators themselves have no intrinsic phase difference.

Interference patterns can be complicated. In the set-up below, for example, we have an array of oscillators producing not just one but many maxima. In fact, the array consists of just two sources of radiation, separated by 10 wavelengths.

Interference two dipole radiatorsThe explanation is fairly simple. Once again, the waves emitted by the two point sources will be in phase in the east-west (E-W) direction, and so we get a strong intensity there: four times more, in fact, than what we would get if we’d just have one point source. Indeed, the waves are perfectly in sync and, hence, add up, and the factor four is explained by the fact that the intensity, or the energy of the wave, is proportional to the square of the amplitude: 2= 4. We get the first minimum at a small angle away (the angle from the normal is denoted by ϕ in the illustration), where the arrival times differ by 180°, and so there is destructive interference and the intensity is zero. To be precise, if we draw a line from each oscillator to a distant point and the difference Δ in the two distances is λ/2, half an oscillation, then they will be out of phase. So this first null occurs when that happens. If we move a bit further, to the point where the difference Δ is equal to λ, then the two waves will be a whole cycle out of phase, i.e. 360°, which is the same as being exactly in phase again! And so we get many maxima (and minima) indeed.

But this post should not turn into a lesson on how to construct a radio broadcasting array. The point to note is that diffraction is usually explained using this rather simple theory on interference of waves assuming that the slit itself is an array of point sources, as illustrated below (while the illustrations above were copied from Feynman’s Lectures, the ones below were taken from the Wikipedia article on diffraction). This is referred to as the Huygens-Fresnel Principle, and the math behind is summarized in Kirchhoff’s diffraction formula.

500px-Refraction_on_an_aperture_-_Huygens-Fresnel_principle Huygens_Fresnel_Principle 

Now, that all looks easy enough, but the illustration above triggers an obvious question: what about the spacing between those imaginary point sources? Why do we have six in the illustration above? The relation between the length of the array and the wavelength is obviously important: we get the interference pattern that we get with those two point sources above because the distance between them is 10λ. If that distance would be different, we would get a different interference pattern. But so how does it work exactly? If we’d keep the length of the array the same (L = 10λ) but we would add more point sources, would we get the same pattern?

The easy answer is yes, and Kirchhoff’s formula actually assumes we have an infinite number of point sources between those two slits: every point becomes the source of a spherical wave, and the sum of these secondary waves then yields the interference pattern. The animation below shows the diffraction pattern from a slit with a width equal to five times the wavelength of the incident wave. The diffraction pattern is the same as above: one strong central beam with weaker lobes on the sides.

5wavelength=slitwidthsprectrum

However, the truth is somewhat more complicated. The illustration below shows the interference pattern for an array of length L = 10λ–so that’s like the situation with two point sources above–but with four additional point sources to the two we had already. The intensity in the E–W direction is much higher, as we would expect. Adding six waves in phase yields a field strength that is six times as great and, hence, the intensity (which is proportional to the square of the field) is thirty-six times as great as compared to the intensity of one individual oscillator. Also, when we look at neighboring points, we find a minimum and then some more ‘bumps’, as before, but then, at an angle of 30°, we get a second beam with the same intensity as the central beam. Now, that’s something we do not see in the diffraction patterns above. So what’s going on here?

Six-dipole antenna

Before I answer that question, I’d like to compare with the quantum-mechanical explanation. It turns out that this question in regard to the relevance of the number of point sources also pops up in Feynman’s quantum-mechanical explanation of diffraction.

The quantum-mechanical explanation of diffraction

The illustration below (taken from Feynman’s QED, p. 55-56) presents the quantum-mechanical point of view. It is assumed that light consists of a photons, and these photons can follow any path. Each of these paths is associated with what Feynman simply refers to as an arrow, but so it’s a vector with a magnitude and a direction: in other words, it’s a complex number representing a probability amplitude.

Many arrows Few arrows

In order to get the probability for a photon to travel from the source (S) to a point (P or Q), we have to add up all the ‘arrows’ to arrive at a final ‘arrow’, and then we take its (absolute) square to get the probability. The text under each of the two illustrations above speaks for itself: when we have ‘enough’ arrows (i.e. when we allow for many neighboring paths, as in the illustration on the left), then the arrows for all of the paths from S to P will add up to one big arrow, because there is hardly any difference in time between them, while the arrows associated with the paths to Q will cancel out, because the difference in time between them is fairly large. Hence, the light will not go to Q but travel to P, i.e. in a straight line.

However, when the gap is nearly closed (so we have a slit or a small aperture), then we have only a few neighboring paths, and then the arrows to Q also add up, because there is hardly any difference in time between them too. As I am quoting from Feynman’s QED here, let me quote all of the relevant paragraph: “Of course, both final arrows are small, so there’s not much light either way through such a small hole, but the detector at Q will click almost as much as the one at P ! So when you try to squeeze light too much to make sure it’s going only in a straight line, it refuses to cooperate and begins to spread out. This is an example of the Uncertainty Principle: there is a kind of complementarity between knowledge of where the light goes between the blocks and where it goes afterwards. Precise knowledge of both is impossible.” (Feynman, QED, p. 55-56).

Feynman’s quantum-mechanical explanation is obviously more ‘true’ that the classical explanation, in the sense that it corresponds to what we know is true from all of the 20th century experiments confirming the quantum-mechanical view of reality: photons are weird ‘wavicles’ and, hence, we should indeed analyze diffraction in terms of probability amplitudes, rather than in terms of interference between waves. That being said, Feynman’s presentation is obviously somewhat more difficult to understand and, hence, the classical explanation remains appealing. In addition, Feynman’s explanation triggers a similar question as the one I had on the number of point sources. Not enough arrows !? What do we mean with that? Why can’t we have more of them? What determines their number?

Let’s first look at their direction. Where does that come from? Feynman is a wonderful teacher here. He uses an imaginary stopwatch to determine their direction: the stopwatch starts timing at the source and stops at the destination. But all depends on the speed of the stopwatch hand of course. So how fast does it turn? Feynman is a bit vague about that but notes that “the stopwatch hand turns around faster when it times a blue photon than when it does when timing a red photon.” In other words, the speed of the stopwatch hand depends on the frequency of the light: blue light has a higher frequency (645 THz) and, hence, a shorter wavelength (465 nm) then red light, for which f = 455 THz and λ = 660 nm. Feynman uses this to explain the typical patterns of red, blue, and violet (separated by borders of black), when one shines red and blue light on a film of oil or, more generally,the phenomenon of iridescence in general, as shown below.

Iridescence

As for the size of the arrows, their length is obviously subject to a normalization condition, because all probabilities have to add up to 1. But what about their number? We didn’t answer that question–yet.

The answer, of course, is that the number of arrows and their size are obviously related: we associate a probability amplitude with every way an event can happen, and the (absolute) square of all these probability amplitudes has to add up to 1. Therefore, if we would identify more paths, we would have more arrows, but they would have to be smaller. The end result would be the same though: when the slit is ‘small enough’, the arrows representing the paths to Q would not cancel each other out and, hence, we’d have diffraction.

You’ll say: Hmm… OK. I sort of see the idea, but how do you explain that pattern–the central beam and the smaller side lobes, and perhaps a second beam as well? Well… You’re right to be skeptical. In order to explain the exact pattern, we need to analyze the wave functions, and that requires a mathematical approach rather than the type of intuitive approach which Feynman uses in his little QED booklet. Before we get started on that, however, let me give another example of such intuitive approach.

Diffraction and the Uncertainty Principle

Let’s look at that very first illustration again, which I’ve copied, for your convenience, again below. Feynman uses it (III-2-2) to (a) explain the diffraction pattern which we observe when we send electrons through a slit and (b) to illustrate the Uncertainty Principle. What’s the story?

Well… Before the electrons hit the wall or enter the slit, we have more or less complete information about their momentum, but nothing on their position: we don’t know where they are exactly, and we also don’t know if they are going to hit the wall or go through the slit. So they can be anywhere. However, we do know their energy and momentum. That momentum is horizontal only, as the electron beam is normal to the wall and the slit. Hence, their vertical momentum is zero–before they hit the wall or enter the slit that is. We’ll denote their (horizontal) momentum, i.e. the momentum before they enter the slit, as p0.

Diffraction for particle wave

Now, if an electron happens to go through the slit, and we know because we detected it on the other side, then we know its vertical position (y) at the slit itself with considerable accuracy: that position will be the center of the slit ±B/2. So the uncertainty in position (Δy) is of the order B, so we can write: Δy = B. However, according to the Uncertainty Principle, we cannot have precise knowledge about its position and its momentum. In addition, from the diffraction pattern itself, we know that the electron acquires some vertical momentum. Indeed, some electrons just go straight, but more stray a bit away from the normal. From the interference pattern, we know that the vast majority stays within an angle Δθ, as shown in the plot. Hence, plain trigonometry allows us to write the spread in the vertical momentum py as p0Δθ, with pthe horizontal momentum. So we have Δpy = p0Δθ.

Now, what is Δθ? Well… Feynman refers to the classical analysis of the phenomenon of diffraction (which I’ll reproduce in the next section) and notes, correctly, that the first minimum occurs at an angle such that the waves from one edge of the slit have to travel one wavelength farther than the waves from the other side. The geometric analysis (which, as noted, I’ll reproduce in the next section) shows that that angle is equal to the wavelength divided by the width of the slit, so we have Δθ = λ/B. So now we can write:

Δpy = p0Δθ = p0λ/B

That shows that the uncertainty in regard to the vertical momentum is, indeed, inversely proportional to the uncertainty in regard to its position (Δy), which is the slit width B. But we can go one step further. The de Broglie relation relates wavelength to momentum: λ = h/p. What momentum? Well… Feynman is a bit vague on that: he equates it with the electron’s horizontal momentum, so he writes λ = h/p0. Is this correct? Well… Yes and no. The de Broglie relation associates a wavelength with the total momentum, but then it’s obvious that most of the momentum is still horizontal, so let’s go along with this. What about the wavelength? What wavelength are we talking about here? It’s obviously the wavelength of the complex-valued wave function–the ‘probability wave’ so to say.

OK. So, what’s next? Well… Now we can write that Δpy = p0Δθ = p0λ/B = p0(h/p0)/B. Of course, the pfactor vanishes and, hence, bringing B to the other side and substituting for Δy = B yields the following grand result:

Δy·Δp= h

Wow ! Did Feynman ‘prove’ Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle here?

Well… No. Not really. First, the ‘proof’ above actually assumes there’s fundamental uncertainty as to the position and momentum of a particle (so it actually assumes some uncertainty principle from the start), and then it derives it from another fundamental assumption, i.e. the de Broglie relation, which is obviously related to the Uncertainty Principle. Hence, all of the above is only an illustration of the Uncertainty Principle. It’s no proof. As far as I know, one can’t really ‘prove’ the Uncertainty Principle: it’s a fundamental assumption which, if accepted, makes our observations consistent with the theory that is based on it, i.e. quantum or wave mechanics.

Finally, note that everything that I wrote above also takes the diffraction pattern as a given and, hence, while all of the above indeed illustrates the Uncertainty Principle, it’s not an explanation of the phenomenon of diffraction as such. For such explanation, we need a rigorous mathematical analysis, and that’s a classical analysis. Let’s go for it!

Going from six to n oscillators

The mathematics involved in analyzing diffraction and/or interference are actually quite tricky. If you’re alert, then you should have noticed that I used two illustrations that both have six oscillators but that the interference pattern doesn’t match. I’ve reproduced them below. The illustration on the right-hand side has six oscillators and shows a second beam besides the central one–and, of course, there’s such beam also 30° higher, so we have (at least) three beams with the same intensity here–while the animation on the left-hand side shows only one central beam. So what’s going on here?

Six-dipole antenna Huygens_Fresnel_Principle

The answer is that, in the particular example on the left-hand side, the successive dipole radiators (i.e. the point sources) are separated by a distance of two wavelengths (2λ). In that case, it is actually possible to find an angle where the distance δ between successive dipoles is exactly one wavelength (note the little δ in the illustration, as measured from the second point source), so that the effects from all of them are in phase again. So each one is then delayed relative to the next one by 360 degrees, and so they all come back in phase, and then we have another strong beam in that direction! In this case, the other strong beam has an angle of 30 degrees as compared to the E-W line. If we would put in some more oscillators, to ensure that they are all closer than one wavelength apart, then this cannot happen. And so it’s not happening with light. 🙂 But now that we’re here, I’ll just quickly note that it’s an interesting and useful phenomenon used in diffraction gratings, but I’ll refer you to the literature on that, as I shouldn’t be bothering you with all these digressions. So let’s get back at it.

In fact, let me skip the nitty-gritty of the detailed analysis (I’ll refer you to Feynman’s Lectures for that) and just present the grand result for n oscillators, as depicted below:

n oscillatorsThis, indeed, shows the diffraction pattern we are familiar with: one strong maximum separated from successive smaller ones (note that the dotted curve magnifies the actual curve with a factor 10). The vertical axis shows the intensity, but expressed as a fraction of the maximum intensity, which is n2I(Iis the intensity we would observe if there was only 1 oscillator). As for the horizontal axis, the variable there is ϕ really, although we re-scale the variable in order to get 1, 2, 2 etcetera for the first, second, etcetera minimum. This ϕ is the phase difference. It consists of two parts:

  1. The intrinsic relative phase α, i.e. the difference in phase between one oscillator and the next: this is assumed to be zero in all of the examples of diffraction patterns above but so the mathematical analysis here is somewhat more general.
  2. The phase difference which results from the fact that we are observing the array in a given direction θ from the normal. Now that‘s the interesting bit, and it’s not so difficult to show that this additional phase is equal to 2πdsinθ/λ, with d the distance between two oscillators, λ the wavelength of the radiation, and θ the angle from the normal.

In short, we write:

ϕ α 2πdsinθ/λ

Now, because I’ll have to use the variables below in the analysis that follows, I’ll quickly also reproduce the geometry of the set-up (all illustrations here taken from Feynman’s Lectures): 

geometry

Before I proceed, please note that we assume that d is less than λ, so we only have one great maximum, and that’s the so-called zero-order beam centered at θ 0. In order to get subsidiary great maxima (referred to as first-order, second-order, etcetera beams in the context of diffraction gratings), we must have the spacing d of the array greater than one wavelength, but so that’s not relevant for what we’re doing here, and that is to move from a discrete analysis to a continuous one.

Before we do that, let’s look at that curve again and analyze where the first minimum occurs. If we assume that α = 0 (no intrinsic relative phase), then the first minimum occurs when ϕ 2π/n. Using the ϕ α 2πdsinθ/λ formula, we get 2πdsinθ/λ 2π/n or ndsinθ λ. What does that mean? Well, nd is the total length L of the array, so we have ndsinθ Lsinθ Δ = λWhat that means is that we get the first minimum when Δ is equal to one wavelength.

Now why do we get a minimum when Δ λ? Because the contributions of the various oscillators are then uniformly distributed in phase from 0° to 360°. What we’re doing, once again, is adding arrows in order to get a resultant arrow AR, as shown below for n = 6. At the first minimum, the arrows are going around a whole circle: we are adding equal vectors in all directions, and such a sum is zero. So when we have an angle θ such that Δ λ, we get the first minimum. [Note that simple trigonometry rules imply that θ must be equal to λ/L, a fact which we used in that quantum-mechanical analysis of electron diffraction above.]    

Adding waves

What about the second minimum? Well… That occurs when ϕ = 4π/n. Using the ϕ 2πdsinθ/λ formula again, we get 2πdsinθ/λ = 4π/n or ndsinθ = 2λ. So we get ndsinθ Lsinθ Δ = 2λ. So we get the second minimum at an angle θ such that Δ = 2λFor the third minimum, we have ϕ = 6π/n. So we have 2πdsinθ/λ = 6π/n or ndsinθ = 3λ. So we get the third minimum at an angle θ such that Δ = 3λAnd so on and so on.

The point to note is that the diffraction pattern depends only on the wavelength λ and the total length L of the array, which is the width of the slit of course. Hence, we can actually extend the analysis for n going from some fixed value to infinity, and we’ll find that we will only have one great maximum with a lot of side lobes that are much and much smaller, with the minima occurring at angles such that Δ = λ, 2λ, 3λ, etcetera.

OK. What’s next? Well… Nothing. That’s it. I wanted to do a post on diffraction, and so that’s what I did. However, to wrap it all up, I’ll just include two more images from Wikipedia. The one on the left shows the diffraction pattern of a red laser beam made on a plate after passing a small circular hole in another plate. The pattern is quite clear. On the right-hand side, we have the diffraction pattern generated by ordinary white light going through a hole. In fact, it’s a computer-generated image and the gray scale intensities have been adjusted to enhance the brightness of the outer rings, because we would not be able to see them otherwise.

283px-Airy-pattern 600px-Laser_Interference

But… Didn’t I say I would write about diffraction and the Uncertainty Principle? Yes. And I admit I did not write all that much about the Uncertainty Principle above. But so I’ll do that in my next post, in which I intend to look at Heisenberg’s own illustration of the Uncertainty Principle. That example involves a good understanding of the resolving power of a lens or a microscope, and such understanding also involves some good mathematical analysis. However, as this post has become way too long already, I’ll leave that to the next post indeed. I’ll use the left-hand image above for that, so have a good look at it. In fact, let me quickly quote Wikipedia as an introduction to my next post:

The diffraction pattern resulting from a uniformly-illuminated circular aperture has a bright region in the center, known as the Airy disk which together with the series of concentric bright rings around is called the Airy pattern.

We’ll need in order to define the resolving power of a microscope, which is essential to understanding Heisenberg’s illustration of the Principle he advanced himself. But let me stop here, as it’s the topic of my next write-up indeed. This post has become way too long already. 🙂

Photons as strings

In my previous post, I explored, somewhat jokingly, the grey area between classical physics and quantum mechanics: light as a wave versus light as a particle. I did so by trying to picture a photon as an electromagnetic transient traveling through space, as illustrated below. While actual physicists would probably deride my attempt to think of a photon as an electromagnetic transient traveling through space, the idea illustrates the wave-particle duality quite well, I feel.

Photon wave

Understanding light is the key to understanding physics. Light is a wave, as Thomas Young proved to the Royal Society of London in 1803, thereby demolishing Newton’s corpuscular theory. But its constituents, photons, behave like particles. According to modern-day physics, both were right. Just to put things in perspective, the thickness of the note card which Young used to split the light – ordinary sunlight entering his room through a pinhole in a window shutter – was 1/30 of an inch, or approximately 0.85 mm. Hence, in essence, this is a double-slit experiment with the two slits being separated by a distance of almost 1 millimeter. That’s enormous as compared to modern-day engineering tolerance standards: what was thin then, is obviously not considered to be thin now. Scale matters. I’ll come back to this.

Young’s experiment (from www.physicsclassroom.com)

Young experiment

The table below shows that the ‘particle character’ of electromagnetic radiation becomes apparent when its frequency is a few hundred terahertz, like the sodium light example I used in my previous post: sodium light, as emitted by sodium lamps, has a frequency of 500×1012 oscillations per second and, therefore (the relation between frequency and wavelength is very straightforward: their product is the velocity of the wave, so for light we have the simple λf = c equation), a wavelength of 600 nanometer (600×10–9 meter).

Electromagnetic spectrum

However, whether something behaves like a particle or a wave also depends on our measurement scale: 0.85 mm was thin in Young’s time, and so it was a delicate experiment then but now, it’s a standard classroom experiment indeed. The theory of light as a wave would hold until more delicate equipment refuted it. Such equipment came with another sense of scale. It’s good to remind oneself that Einstein’s “discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect”, which explained the photoelectric effect as the result of light energy being carried in discrete quantized packets of energy, now referred to as photons, goes back to 1905 only, and that the experimental apparatus which could measure it was not much older. So waves behave like particles if we look at them close enough. Conversely, particles behave like waves if we look at them close enough. So there is this zone where they are neither, the zone for which we invoke the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics or, to put it more precisely, the formalism of quantum electrodynamics: that “strange theory of light and Matter”, as Feynman calls it.

Let’s have a look at how particles became waves. It should not surprise us that the experimental apparatuses needed to confirm that electrons–or matter in general–can actually behave like a wave is more recent than the 19th century apparatuses which led Einstein to develop his ‘corpuscular’ theory of light (i.e. the theory of light as photons). The engineering tolerances involved are daunting. Let me be precise here. To be sure, the phenomenon of electron diffraction (i.e. electrons going through one slit and producing a diffraction pattern on the other side) had been confirmed experimentally already in 1925, in the famous Davisson-Germer experiment. I am saying because it’s rather famous indeed. First, because electron diffraction was a weird thing to contemplate at the time. Second, because it confirmed the de Broglie hypothesis only two years after Louis de Broglie had advanced it. And, third, because Davisson and Germer had never intended to set it up to detect diffraction: it was pure coincidence. In fact, the observed diffraction pattern was the result of a laboratory accident, and Davisson and Germer weren’t aware of other, conscious, attempts of trying to prove the de Broglie hypothesis. 🙂 […] OK. I am digressing. Sorry. Back to the lesson.

The nanotechnology that was needed to confirm Feynman’s 1965 thought experiment on electron interference (i.e. electrons going through two slits and interfering with each other (rather than producing some diffraction pattern as they go through one slit only) – and, equally significant as an experiment result, with themselves as they go through the slit(s) one by one! – was only developed over the past decades. In fact, it was only in 2008 (and again in 2012) that the experiment was carried out exactly the way Feynman describes it in his Lectures.

It is useful to think of what such experiments entail from a technical point of view. Have a look at the illustration below, which shows the set-up. The insert in the upper-left corner shows the two slits which were used in the 2012 experiment: they are each 62 nanometer wide – that’s 50×10–9 m! – and the distance between them is 272 nanometer, or 0.272 micrometer. [Just to be complete: they are 4 micrometer tall (4×10–6 m), and the thing in the middle of the slits is just a little support (150 nm) to make sure the slit width doesn’t vary.]

The second inset (in the upper-right corner) shows the mask that can be moved to close one or both slits partially or completely. The mask is 4.5µm wide ×20µm tall. Please do take a few seconds to contemplate the technology behind this feat: a nanometer is a millionth of a millimeter, so that’s a billionth of a meter, and a micrometer is a millionth of a meter. To imagine how small a nanometer is, you should imagine dividing one millimeter in ten, and then one of these tenths in ten again, and again, and once again, again, and again. In fact, you actually cannot imagine that because we live in the world we live in and, hence, our mind is used only to addition (and subtraction) when it comes to comparing sizes and – to a much more limited extent – with multiplication (and division): our brain is, quite simply, not wired to deal with exponentials and, hence, it can’t really ‘imagine’ these incredible (negative) powers. So don’t think you can imagine it really, because one can’t: in our mind, these scales exist only as mathematical constructs. They don’t correspond to anything we can actually make a mental picture of.

Electron double-slit set-up

The electron beam consisted of electrons with an (average) energy of 600 eV. That’s not an awful lot: 8.5 times more than the energy of an electron in orbit in a atom, whose energy would be some 70 eV, so the acceleration before they went through the slits was relatively modest. I’ve calculated the corresponding de Broglie wavelength of these electrons in another post (Re-Visiting the Matter-Wave, April 2014), using the de Broglie equations: f = E/h or λ = p/h. And, of course, you could just google the article on the experiment and read about it, but it’s a good exercise, and actually quite simple: just note that you’ll need to express the energy in joule (not in eV) to get it right. Also note that you need to include the rest mass of the electron in the energy. I’ll let you try it (or else just go to that post of mine). You should find a de Broglie wavelength of 50 picometer for these electrons, so that’s 50×10–12 m. While that wavelength is less than a thousandth of the slit width (62 nm), and about 5,500 times smaller than the space between the two slits (272 nm), the interference effect was unambiguous in the experiment. I advice you to google the results yourself (or read that April 2014 post of mine if you want a summary): the experiment was done at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 2012.

Electrons and X-rays

To put everything in perspective: 50 picometer is like the wavelength of X-rays, and you can google similar double-slit experiments for X-rays: they also loose their ‘particle behavior’ when we look at them at this tiny scale. In short, scale matters, and the boundary between ‘classical physics’ (electromagnetics) and quantum physics (wave mechanics) is not clear-cut. If anything, it depends on our perspective, i.e. what we can measure, and we seem to be shifting that boundary constantly. In what direction?

Downwards obviously: we’re devising instruments that measure stuff at smaller and smaller scales, and what’s happening is that we can ‘see’ typical ‘particles’, including hard radiation such as gamma rays, as local wave trains. Indeed, the next step is clear-cut evidence for interference between gamma rays.

Energy levels of photons

We would not associate low-frequency electromagnetic waves, such as radio or radar waves, with photons. But light in the visible spectrum, yes. Obviously. […]

Isn’t that an odd dichotomy? If we see that, on a smaller scale, particles start to look like waves, why would the reverse not be true? Why wouldn’t we analyze radio or radar waves, on a much larger scale, as a stream of very (I must say extremely) low-energy photons? I know the idea sounds ridiculous, because the energies involved would be ridiculously low indeed. Think about it. The energy of a photon is given by the Planck relation: E = h= hc/λ. For visible light, with wavelengths ranging from 800 nm (red) to 400 nm (violet or indigo), the photon energies range between 1.5 and 3 eV. Now, the shortest wavelengths for radar waves are in the so-called millimeter band, i.e. they range from 1 mm to 1 cm. A wavelength of 1 mm corresponds to a photon energy of 0.00124 eV. That’s close to nothing, of course, and surely not the kind of energy levels that we can currently detect.

But you get the idea: there is a grey area between classical physics and quantum mechanics, and it’s our equipment–notably the scale of our measurements–that determine where that grey area begins, and where it ends, and it seems to become larger and larger as the sensitivity of our equipment improves.

What do I want to get at? Nothing much. Just some awareness of scale, as an introduction to the actual topic of this post, and that’s some thoughts on a rather primitive string theory of photons. What !? 

Yes. Purely speculative, of course. 🙂

Photons as strings

I think my calculations in the previous post, as primitive as they were, actually provide quite some food for thought. If we’d treat a photon in the sodium light band (i.e. the light emitted by sodium, from a sodium lamp for instance) just like any other electromagnetic pulse, we would find it’s a pulse of some 10 meter long. We also made sense of this incredibly long distance by noting that, if we’d look at it as a particle (which is what we do when analyzing it as a photon), it should have zero size, because it moves at the speed of light and, hence, the relativistic length contraction effect ensures we (or any observer in whatever reference frame really, because light always moves at the speed of light, regardless of the reference frame) will see it as a zero-size particle.

Having said that, and knowing damn well that we have treat the photon as an elementary particle, I would think it’s very tempting to think of it as a vibrating string.

Huh?

Yes. Let me copy that graph again. The assumption I started with is a standard one in physics, and not something that you’d want to argue with: photons are emitted when an electron jumps from a higher to a lower energy level and, for all practical purposes, this emission can be analyzed as the emission of an electromagnetic pulse by an atomic oscillator. I’ll refer you to my previous post – as silly as it is – for details on these basics: the atomic oscillator has a Q, and so there’s damping involved and, hence, the assumption that the electromagnetic pulse resembles a transient should not sound ridiculous. Because the electric field as a function in space is the ‘reversed’ image of the oscillation in time, the suggested shape has nothing blasphemous.

Photon wave

Just go along with it for a while. First, we need to remind ourselves that what’s vibrating here is nothing physical: it’s an oscillating electromagnetic field. That being said, in my previous post, I toyed with the idea that the oscillation could actually also represent the photon’s wave function, provided we use a unit for the electric field that ensures that the area under the squared curve adds up to one, so as to normalize the probability amplitudes. Hence, I suggested that the field strength over the length of this string could actually represent the probability amplitudes, provided we choose an appropriate unit to measure the electric field.

But then I was joking, right? Well… No. Why not consider it? An electromagnetic oscillation packs energy, and the energy is proportional to the square of the amplitude of the oscillation. Now, the probability of detecting a particle is related to its energy, and such probability is calculated from taking the (absolute) square of probability amplitudes. Hence, mathematically, this makes perfect sense.

It’s quite interesting to think through the consequences, and I hope I will (a) understand enough of physics and (b) find enough time for this—one day! One interesting thing is that the field strength (i.e. the magnitude of the electric field vector) is a real number. Hence, if we equate these magnitudes with probability amplitudes, we’d have real probability amplitudes, instead of complex-valued ones. That’s not a very fundamental issue. It probably indicates we should also take into account the fact that the E vector also oscillates in the other direction that’s normal to the direction of propagation, i.e. the y-coordinate (assuming that the z-axis is the direction of propagation). To put it differently, we should take the polarization of the light into account. The figure below–which I took from Wikipedia again (by far the most convenient place to shop for images and animations: what would I do without it?– shows how the electric field vector moves in the xy-plane indeed, as the wave travels along the z-axis. So… Well… I still have to figure it all out, but the idea surely makes sense.

Circular.Polarization.Circularly.Polarized.Light_Right.Handed.Animation.305x190.255Colors

Another interesting thing to think about is how the collapse of the wave function would come about. If we think of a photon as a string, it must have some ‘hooks’ which could cause it to ‘stick’ or ‘collapse’ into a ‘lump’ as it hits a detector. What kind of hook? What force would come into play?

Well… The interaction between the photon and the photodetector is electromagnetic, but we’re looking for some other kind of ‘hook’ here. What could it be? I have no idea. Having said that, we know that the weakest of all fundamental forces—gravity—becomes much stronger—very much stronger—as the distance becomes smaller and smaller. In fact, it is said that, if we go to the Planck scale, the strength of the force of gravity becomes quite comparable with the other forces. So… Perhaps it’s, quite simply, the equivalent mass of the energy involved that gets ‘hooked’, somehow, as it starts interacting with the photon detector. Hence, when thinking about a photon as an oscillating string of energy, we should also think of that string as having some inseparable (equivalent) mass that, once it’s ‘hooked’, has no other option that to ‘collapse into itself’. [You may note there’s no quantum theory for gravity as yet. I am not sure how, but I’ve got a gut instinct that tells me that may help to explain why a photon consists of one single ‘unbreakable’ lump, although I need to elaborate this argument obviously.]

You must be laughing aloud now. A new string theory–really?

I know… I know… I haven’t reach sophomore level and I am already wildly speculating… Well… Yes. What I am talking about here has probably nothing to do with current string theories, although my proposed string would also replace the point-like photon by a one-dimensional ‘string’. However, ‘my’ string is, quite simply, an electromagnetic pulse (a transient actually, for reasons I explained in my previous post). Naive? Perhaps. However, I note that the earliest version of string theory is referred to as bosonic string theory, because it only incorporated bosons, which is what photons are.

So what? Well… Nothing… I am sure others have thought of this too, and I’ll look into it. It’s surely an idea which I’ll keep in the back of my head as I continue to explore physics. The idea is just too simple and beautiful to disregard, even if I am sure it must be pretty naive indeed. Photons as ten-meter long strings? Let’s just forget about it. 🙂 Onwards !!! 🙂

Post Scriptum: The key to ‘closing’ this discussion is, obviously, to be found in a full-blown analysis of the relativity of fields. So, yes, I have not done all of the required ‘homework’ on this and the previous post. I apologize for that. If anything, I hope it helped you to also try to think somewhat beyond the obvious. I realize I wasted a lot of time trying to understand the pre-cooked ready-made stuff that’s ‘on the market’, so to say. I still am, actually. Perhaps I should first thoroughly digest Feynman’s Lectures. In fact, I think that’s what I’ll try to do in the next year or so. Sorry for any inconvenience caused. 🙂

Refraction and Dispersion of Light

In this post, we go right at the heart of classical physics. It’s going to be a very long post – and a very difficult one – but it will really give you a good ‘feel’ of what classical physics is all about. To understand classical physics – in order to compare it, later, with quantum mechanics – it’s essential, indeed, to try to follow the math in order to get a good feel for what ‘fields’ and ‘charges’ and ‘atomic oscillators’ actually represent.

As for the topic of this post itself, we’re going to look at refraction again: light gets dispersed as it travels from one medium to another, as illustrated below. 

Prism_rainbow_schema

Dispersion literally means “distribution over a wide area”, and so that’s what happens as the light travels through the prism: the various frequencies (i.e. the various colors that make up natural ‘white’ light) are being separated out over slightly different angles. In physics jargon, we say that the index of refraction depends on the frequency of the wave – but so we could also say that the breaking angle depends on the color. But that sounds less scientific, of course. In any case, it’s good to get the terminology right. Generally speaking, the term refraction (as opposed to dispersion) is used to refer to the bending (or ‘breaking’) of light of a specific frequency only, i.e. monochromatic light, as shown in the photograph below. […] OK. We’re all set now.

Refraction_photo

It is interesting to note that the photograph above shows how the monochromatic light is actually being obtained: if you look carefully, you’ll see two secondary beams on the left-hand side (with an intensity that is much less than the central beam – barely visible in fact). That suggests that the original light source was sent through a diffraction grating designed to filter only one frequency out of the original light beam. That beam is then sent through a bloc of transparent material (plastic in this case) and comes out again, but displaced parallel to itself. So the block of plastics ‘offsets’ the beam. So how do we explain that in classical physics?

The index of refraction and the dispersion equation

As I mentioned in my previous post, the Greeks had already found out, experimentally, what the index of refraction was. To be more precise, they had measured the θ1 and θ2 – depicted below – for light going from air to water. For example, if the angle in air (θ1) is 20°, then the angle in the water (θ2) will be 15°. It the angle in air is 70°, then the angle in the water will be 45°.   

Refraction_at_interface

Of course, it should be noted that a lot of the light will also be reflected from the water surface (yes, imagine the romance of the image of the moon reflected on the surface of glacial lake while you’re feeling damn cold) – but so that’s a phenomenon which is better  explained by introducing probability amplitudes, and looking at light as a bundle of photons, which we will not do here. I did that in previous posts, and so here, we will just acknowledge that there is a reflected beam but not say anything about it.

In any case, we should go step by step, and I am not doing that right now. Let’s first define the index of refraction. It is a number n which relates the angles above through the following relationship, which is referred to as Snell’s Law:

sinθ1 = n sinθ2

Using the numbers given above, we get: sin(20°) = n sin(15°), and sin(70°) = n sin(45°), so n must be equal to n = sin(20°)/sin(15°)  = sin(70°)/sin(45°) ≈ 1.33. Just for the record, Willibrord Snell was a medieval Dutch astronomer but, according to Wikipedia, some smart Persian, Ibn Sahl, had already jotted this down in a treatise – “On Burning Mirrors and Lenses” – while he was serving the Abbasid court of Baghdad, back in 984, i.e. more than a thousand years ago! What to say? It was obviously a time when the Sunni-Shia divide did not matter, and Arabs and ‘Persians’ were leading civilization. I guess I should just salute the Islamic Golden Age here, regret the time lost during Europe’s Dark Ages and, most importantly, regret where Baghdad is right now ! And, as for the ‘burning’ adjective, it just refers to the fact that large convex lenses can concentrate the sun’s rays to a very small area indeed, thereby causing ignition. [It seems that story about Archimedes burning Roman ships with a ‘death ray’ using mirrors – in all likelihood: something that did not happen – fascinated them as well.]

But let’s get back at it. Where were we? Oh – yes – the refraction index. It’s (usually) a positive number written as n = 1 + some other number which may be positive or negative, and which depends on the properties of the material. To be more specific, it depends on the resonant frequencies of the atoms (or, to be precise, I should say: the resonant frequencies of the electrons bound by the atom, because it’s the charges that generate the radiation). Plus a whole bunch of natural constants that we have encountered already, most of which are related to electrons. Let me jot down the formula – and please don’t be scared away now (you can stop a bit later, but not now 🙂 please):

Formula 1

N is just the number of charges (electrons) per unit volume of the material (e.g. the water, or that block of plastic), and qe and m are just the charge and mass of the electron. And then you have that electric constant once again, ε0, and… Well, that’s it ! That’s not too terrible, is it? So the only variables on the right-hand side are ω0 and ω, so that’s (i) the resonant frequency of the material (or the atoms – well, the electrons bound to the nucleus, to be precise, but then you know what I mean and so I hope you’ll allow me to use somewhat less precise language from time to time) and (ii) the frequency of the incoming light.

The equation above is referred to as the dispersion relation. It’s easy to see why: it relates the frequency of the incoming light to the index of refraction which, in turn, determinates that angle θ. So the formula does indeed determine how light gets dispersed, as a function of the frequencies in it, by some medium indeed (glass, air, water,…).

So the objective of this post is to show how we can derive that dispersion relation using classical physics only. As usual, I’ll follow Feynman – arguably the best physics teacher ever. 🙂 Let me warn you though: it is not a simple thing to do. However, as mentioned above, it goes to the heart of the “classical world view” in physics and so I do think it’s worth the trouble. Before we get going, however, let’s look at the properties of that formula above, and relate it some experimental facts, in order to make sure we more or less understand what it is that we are trying to understand. 🙂

First, we should note that the index of refraction has nothing to do with transparency. In fact, throughout this post, we’ll assume that we’re looking at very transparent materials only, i.e. materials that do not absorb the electromagnetic radiation that tries to go through them, or only absorb it a tiny little bit. In reality, we will have, of course, some – or, in the case of opaque (i.e. non-transparent) materials, a lot – of absorption going on, but so we will deal with that later. So, let me repeat: the index of refraction has nothing to do with transparency. A material can have a (very) high index of refraction but be fully transparent. In fact, diamond is a case in point: it has one of the highest indexes of refraction (2.42) of any material that’s naturally available, but it’s – obviously – perfectly transparent. [In case you’re interested in jewellery, the refraction index of its most popular substitute, cubic zirconia, comes very close (2.15-2.18) and, moreover, zirconia actually works better as a prism, so its disperses light better than diamond, which is why it reflects more colors. Hence, real diamond actually sparkles less than zirconia! So don’t be fooled! :-)]

Second, it’s obvious that the index of refraction depends on two variables indeed: the natural, or resonant frequency, ω0, and the frequency ω, which is the frequency of the incoming light. For most of the ordinary gases, including those that make up air (i.e. nitrogen (78%) and oxygen (21%), plus some vapor (averaging 1%) and the so-called noble gas argon (0.93%) – noble because, just like helium and neon, it’s colorless, odorless and doesn’t react easily), the natural frequencies of the electron oscillators are close to the frequency of ultraviolet light. [The greenhouse gases are a different story – which is why we’re in trouble on this planet. Anyway…] So that’s why air absorbs most of the UV, especially the cancer-causing ultraviolet-C light (UVC), which is formally classified as a carcinogen by the World Health Organization. The wavelength of UVC light is 100 to 300 nanometer – as opposed to visible light, which has a wavelength ranging from 400 to 700 nm – and, hence, the frequency of UV light is in the 1000 to 3000 Teraherz range (1 THz = 1012 oscillations per second) – as opposed to visible light, which has a frequency in the range of 400 to 800 THz. So, because we’re squaring those frequencies in the formula, ω2 can then be disregarded in comparison with ω02: for example, 15002 = 2,250,000 and that’s not very different from 15002 – 5002 = 2,000,000. Hence, if we leave the ω2 out, we are still dividing by a very large number. That’s why n is very close to one for visible light entering the atmosphere from space (i.e. the vacuum). Its value is, in fact, around 1.000292 for incoming light with a wavelength of 589.3 nm (the odd value is the mean of so-called sodium D light, a pretty common yellow-orange light (street lights!), so that’s why it’s used as a reference value – however, don’t worry about it).

That being said, while the n of air is close to one for all visible light, the index is still slightly higher for blue light as compared to red light, and that’s why the sky is blue, except in the morning and evening, when it’s reddish. Indeed, the illustration below is a bit silly, but it gives you the idea. [I took this from http://mathdept.ucr.edu/ so I’ll refer you to that for the full narrative on that. :-)]

blue_sky

Where are we in this story? Oh… Yes. Two frequencies. So we should also note that – because we have two frequency variables – it also makes sense to talk about, for instance, the index of refraction of graphite (i.e. carbon in its most natural occurrence, like in coal) for x-rays. Indeed, coal is definitely not transparent to visible light (that has to do with the absorption phenomenon, which we’ll discuss later) but it is very ‘transparent’ to x-rays. Hence, we can talk about how graphite bends x-rays, for example. In fact, the frequency of x-rays is much higher than the natural frequency of the carbon atoms and, hence, in this case we can neglect the w02 factor, so we get a denominator that is negative (because only the -w2 remains relevant), so we get a refraction index that is (a bit) smaller than 1. [Of course, our body is transparent to x-rays too – to a large extent – but in different degrees, and that’s why we can take x-ray photographs of, for example, a broken rib or leg.]

OK. […] So that’s just to note that we can have a refraction index that is smaller than one and that’s not ‘anomalous’ – even if that’s a historical term that has survived. 

Finally, last but not least as they say, you may have heard that scientists and engineers have managed to construct so-called negative index metamaterials. That matter is (much) more complicated than you might think, however, and so I’ll refer you to the Web if you want to find out more about that.

Light going through a glass plate: the classical idea

OK. We’re now ready to crack the nut. We’ll closely follow my ‘Great Teacher’ Feynman (Lectures, Vol. I-31) as he derives that formula above. Let me warn you again: the narrative below is quite complicated, but really worth the trouble – I think. The key to it all is the illustration below. The idea is that we have some electromagnetic radiation emanating from a far-away source hitting a glass plate – or whatever other transparent material. [Of course, nothing is to scale here: it’s just to make sure you get the theoretical set-up.] 

radiation and transparent sheet

So, as I explained in my previous post, the source creates an oscillating electromagnetic field which will shake the electrons up and down in the glass plate, and then these shaking electrons will generate their own waves. So we look at the glass as an assembly of little “optical-frequency radio stations” indeed, that are all driven with a given phase. It creates two new waves: one reflecting back, and one modifying the original field.

Let’s be more precise. What do we have here? First, we have the field that’s generated by the source, which is denoted by Es above. Then we have the “reflected” wave (or field – not much difference in practice), so that’s Eb. As mentioned above, this is the classical theory, not the quantum-electrodynamical one, so we won’t say anything about this reflection really: just note that the classical theory acknowledges that some of the light is effectively being reflected.

OK. Now we go to the other side of the glass. What do we expect to see there? If we would not have the glass plate in-between, we’d have the same Es field obviously, but so we don’t: there is a glass plate. 🙂 Hence, the “transmitted” wave, or the field that’s arriving at point P let’s say, will be different than Es. Feynman writes it as Es + Ea

Hmm… OK. So what can we say about that? Not easy…

The index of refraction and the apparent speed of light in a medium

Snell’s Law – or Ibn Sahl’s Law – was re-formulated, by a 17th century French lawyer with an interesting in math and physics, Pierre de Fermat, as the Principle of Least Time. It is a way of looking at things really – but it’s very confusing actually. Fermat assumed that light traveling through a medium (water or glass, for instance) would travel slower, by a certain factor n, which – indeed – turns out to be the index of refraction. But let’s not run before we can walk. The Principle is illustrated below. If light has to travel from point S (the source) to point D (the detector), then the fastest way is not the straight line from S to D, but the broken S-L-D line. Now, I won’t go into the geometry of this but, with a bit of trial and error, you can verify for yourself that it turns out that the factor n will indeed be the same factor n as the one which was ‘discovered’ by Ibn Sahl: sinθ1 = n sinθ2.

Least time principle

What we have then, is that the apparent speed of the wave in the glass plate that we’re considering here will be equal to v = c/n. The apparent speed? So does that mean it is not the real speed? Hmm… That’s actually the crux of the matter. The answer is: yes and no. What? An ambiguous answer in physics? Yes. It’s ambiguous indeed. What’s the speed of a wave? We mentioned above that n could be smaller than one. Hence, in that case, we’d have a wave traveling faster than the speed of light. How can we make sense of that?

We can make sense of that by noting that the wave crests or nodes may be traveling faster than c, but that the wave itself – as a signal – cannot travel faster than light. It’s related to what we said about the difference between the group and phase velocity of a wave. The phase velocity – i.e. the nodes, which are mathematical points only – can travel faster than light, but the signal as such, i.e. the wave envelope in the illustration below, cannot.

Wave_group (1)

What is happening really is the following. A wave will hit one of these electron oscillators and start a so-called transient, i.e. a temporary response preceding the ‘steady state’ solution (which is not steady but dynamic – confusing language once again – so sorry!). So the transient settles down after a while and then we have an equilibrium (or steady state) oscillation which is likely to be out of phase with the driving field. That’s because there is damping: the electron oscillators resist before they go along with the driving force (and they continue to put up resistance, so the oscillation will die out when the driving force stops!). The illustration below shows how it works for the various cases:

delay and advance of phase

In case (b), the phase of the transmitted wave will appear to be delayed, which results in the wave appearing to travel slower, because the distance between the wave crests, i.e. the wavelength λ, is being shortened. In case (c), it’s the other way around: the phase appears to be advanced, which translated into a bigger distance between wave crests, or a lengthening of the wavelength, which translates into an apparent higher speed of the transmitted wave.

So here we just have a mathematical relationship between the (apparent) speed of a wave and its wavelength. The wavelength is the (apparent) speed of the wave (that’s the speed with which the nodes of the wave travel through space, or the phase velocity) divided by the frequency: λ = vp/f. However, from the illustration above, it is obvious that the signal, i.e. the start of the wave, is not earlier – or later – for either wave (b) and (c). In fact, the start of the wave, in time, is exactly the same for all three cases. Hence, the electromagnetic signal travels at the same speed c, always.

While this may seem obvious, it’s quite confusing, and therefore I’ll insert one more illustration below. What happens when the various wave fronts of the traveling field hit the glass plate (coming from the top-left hand corner), let’s say at time t = t0, as shown below, is that the wave crests will have the same spacing along the surface. That’s obvious because we have a regular wave with a fixed frequency and, hence, a fixed wavelength λ0, here. Now, these wave crests must also travel together as the wave continues its journey through the glass, which is what is shown by the red and green arrows below: they indicate where the wave crest is after one and two periods (T and 2T) respectively.

Wave crest and frequency

To understand what’s going on, you should note that the frequency f of the wave that is going through the glass sheet and, hence, its period T, has not changed. Indeed, the driven oscillation, which was illustrated for the two possible cases above (n > 1 and n < 1), after the transient has settled down, has the same frequency (f) as the driving source. It must. Always. That being said, the driven oscillation does have that phase delay (remember: we’re in the (b) case here, but we can make a similar analysis for the (c) case). In practice, that means that the (shortest) distance between the crests of the wave fronts at time t = t0 and the crests at time t0 + T will be smaller. Now, the (shortest) distance between the crests of a wave is, obviously, the wavelength divided by the frequency: λ = vp/f, with vp the speed of propagation, i.e. the phase velocity, of the wave, and f = 1/T. [The frequency f is the reciprocal of the period T – always. When studying physics, I found out it’s useful to keep track of a few relationships that hold always, and so this is one of them. :-)]

Now, the frequency is the same, but so the wavelength is shortened as the wave travels through the various layers of electron oscillators, each causing a delay of phase – and, hence, a shortening of the wavelength, as shown above. But, if f is the same, and the wavelength is shorter, then vp cannot be equal to the speed of the incoming light, so vp ≠ c. The apparent speed of the wave traveling through the glass, and the associated shortening of the wavelength, can be calculated using Snell’s Law. Indeed, knowing that n ≈ 1.33, we can calculate the apparent speed of light through the glass as v = c/n  ≈ 0.75c and, therefore, we can calculate the wavelength of the wave in the glass l as λ = 0.75λ0.

OK. I’ve been way too lengthy here. Let’s sum it all up:

  • The field in the glass sheet must have the shape that’s depicted above: there is no other way. So that means the direction of ‘propagation’ has been changed. As mentioned above, however, the direction of propagation is a ‘mathematical’ property of the field: it’s not the speed of the ‘signal’.
  • Because the direction of propagation is normal to the wave front, it implies that the bending of light rays comes about because the effective speed of the waves is different in the various materials or, to be even more precise, because the electron oscillators cause a delay of phase.
  • While the speed and direction of propagation of the wave, i.e. the phase velocity, accurately describes the behavior of the field, it is not the speed with which the signal is traveling (see above). That is why it can be larger or smaller than c, and so it should not raise any eyebrow. For x-rays in particular, we have a refractive index smaller than one. [It’s only slightly less than one, though, and, hence, x-ray images still have a very good resolution. So don’t worry about your doctor getting a bad image of your broken leg. 🙂 In case you want to know more about this: just Google x-ray optics, and you’ll find loads of information. :-)]  

Calculating the field

Are you still there? Probably not. If you are, I am afraid you won’t be there ten or twenty minutes from now. Indeed, you ain’t done nothing yet. All of the above was just setting the stage: we’re now ready for the pièce de résistance, as they say in French. We’re back at that illustration of the glass plate and the various fields in front and behind the plate. So we have electron oscillators in the glass plate. Indeed, as Feynman notes: “As far as problems involving light are concerned, the electrons behave as though they were held by springs. So we shall suppose that the electrons have a linear restoring force which, together with their mass m, makes them behave like little oscillators, with a resonant frequency ω0.”

So here we go:

1. From everything I wrote about oscillators in previous posts, you should remember that the equation for this motion can be written as m[d2x/dt2 + ω02) = F. That’s just Newton’s Law. Now, the driving force F comes from the electric field and will be equal to F = qeEs.

Now, we assume that we can chose the origin of time (i.e. the moment from which we start counting) such that the field Es = E0cos(ωt). To make calculations easier, we look at this as the real part of a complex function Es = E0eiωt. So we get:

m[d2x/dt2 + ω02] = qeE0eiωt

We’ve solved this before: its solution is x = x0eiωt. We can just substitute this in the equation above to find x0 (just substitute and take the first- and then second-order derivative of x indeed): x0 = qeE0/m(ω022). That, then, gives us the first piece in this lengthy derivation:

x = qeE0eiωt/m(ω02 2)

Just to make sure you understand what we’re doing: this piece gives us the motion of the electrons in the plate. That’s all.

2. Now, we need an equation for the field produced by a plane of oscillating charges, because that’s what we’ve got here: a plate or a plane of oscillating charges. That’s a complicated derivation in its own, which I won’t do there. I’ll just refer to another chapter of Feynman’s Lectures (Vol. I-30-7) and give you the solution for it (if I wouldn’t do that, this post would be even longer than it already is):

Formula 2

This formula introduces just one new variable, η, which is the number of charges per unit area of the plate (as opposed to N, which was the number of charges per unit volume in the plate), so that’s quite straightforward. Less straightforward is the formula itself: this formula says that the magnitude of the field is proportional to the velocity of the charges at time t – z/c, with z the shortest distance from P to the plane of charges. That’s a bit odd, actually, but so that’s the way it comes out: “a rather simple formula”, as Feynman puts it.

In any case, let’s use it. Differentiating x to get the velocity of the charges, and plugging it into the formula above yields:

Formula 3

Note that this is only Ea, the additional field generated by the oscillating charges in the glass plate. To get the total electric field at P, we still have to add Es, i.e. the field generated by the source itself. This may seem odd, because you may think that the glass plate sort of ‘shields’ the original field but, no, as Feynman puts it: “The total electric field in any physical circumstance is the sum of the fields from all the charges in the universe.”

3. As mentioned above, z is the distance from P to the plate. Let’s look at the set-up here once again. The transmitted wave, or Eafter the plate as we shall note it, consists of two components: Es and Ea. Es here will be equal to (the real part of) Es = E0eiω(t-z/c). Why t – z/c instead of just t? Well… We’re looking at Es here as measured in P, not at Es at the glass plate itself.   

radiation and transparent sheet

Now, we know that the wave ‘travels slower’ through the glass plate (in the sense that its phase velocity is less, as should be clear from the rather lengthy explanation on phase delay above, or – if n would be greater than one – a phase advance). So if the glass plate is of thickness Δz, and the phase velocity is is v = c/n, then the time it will take to travel through the glass plate will be Δz/(c/n) instead of Δz/c (speed is distance divided by time and, hence, time = distance divided by speed). So the additional time that is needed is Δt = Δz/(c/n) – Δz/c = nΔz/c – Δz/c = (n-1)Δz/c. That, then, implies that Eafter the plate is equal to a rather monstrously looking expression:    

Eafter plate = E0eiω[t (n1)Δz/c z/c) = eiω(n1)Δz/c)E0eiω(t z/c)

We get this by just substituting t for t – Δt.

So what? Well… We have a product of two complex numbers here and so we know that this involves adding angles – or substracting angles in this case, rather, because we’ve got a minus sign in the exponent of the first factor. So, all that we are saying here is that the insertion of the glass plate retards the phase of the field with an amount equal to w(n-1)Δz/c. What about that sum Eafter the plate = Es + Ea that we were supposed to get?

Well… We’ll use the formula for a first-order (linear) approximation of an exponential once again: ex ≈ 1 + x. Yes. We can do that because Δz is assumed to be very small, infinitesimally small in fact. [If it is not, then we’ll just have to assume that the plate consists of a lot of very thin plates.] So we can write that eiω(n-1)Δz/c) = 1 – iω(n-1)Δz/c, and then we, finally, get that sum we wanted:

Eafter plate = E0eiω[t z/c) iω(n-1)Δz·E0eiω(t z/c)/c

The first term is the original Es field, and the second term is the Ea field. Geometrically, they can be represented as follows:

Addition of fields

Why is Ea perpendicular to Es? Well… Look at the –i = 1/i factor. Multiplication with –i amounts to a clockwise rotation by 90°, and then just note that the magnitude of the vector must be small because of the ω(n-1)Δz/c factor.  

4. By now, you’ve either stopped reading (most probably) or, else, you wonder what I am getting at. Well… We have two formulas for Ea now:

Formula 4

and Ea = – iω(n-1)Δz·E0eiω(t – z/c)/c

Equating both yields:

Formula 5

But η, the number of charges per unit area, must be equal to NΔz, with N the number of charges per unit volume. Substituting and then cancelling the Δz finally gives us the formula we wanted, and that’s the classical dispersion relation whose properties we explored above:

Formula 6

Absorption and the absorption index

The model we used to explain the index of refraction had electron oscillators at its center. In the analysis we did, we did not introduce any damping factor. That’s obviously not correct: it means that a glass plate, once it had illuminated, would continue to emit radiation, because the electrons would oscillate forever. When introducing damping, the denominator in our dispersion relation becomes m(ω02 – ω2 + iγω), instead of m(ω02 – ω2). We derived this in our posts on oscillators. What it means is that the oscillator continues to oscillate with the same frequency as the driving force (i.e. not its natural frequency) – so that doesn’t change – but that there is an envelope curve, ensuring the oscillation dies out when the driving force is no longer being applied. The γ factor is the damping factor and, hence, determines how fast the damping happens.

We can see what it means by writing the complex index of refraction as n = n’ – in’’, with n’ and n’’ real numbers, describing the real and imaginary part of n respectively. Putting that complex n in the equation for the electric field behind the plate yields:

Eafter plate = eωn’’Δz/ceiω(n’1)Δz/cE0eiω(t z/c)

This is the same formula that we had derived already, but so we have an extra exponential factor: eωn’’Δz/c. It’s an exponential factor with a real exponent, because there were two i‘s that cancelled. The e-x function has a familiar shape (see below): e-x is 1 for x = 0, and between 0 and 1 for any value in-between. That value will depend on the thickness of the glass sheet. Hence, it is obvious that the glass sheet weakens the wave as it travels through it. Hence, the wave must also come out with less energy (the energy being proportional to the square of the amplitude). That’s no surprise: the damping we put in for the electron oscillators is a friction force and, hence, must cause a loss of energy.

Note that it is the n’’ term – i.e. the imaginary part of the refractive index n – that determines the degree of absorption (or attenuation, if you want). Hence, n’’ is usually referred to as the “absorption index”.

The complete dispersion relation

We need to add one more thing in order to get a fully complete dispersion relation. It’s the last thing: then we have a formula which can really be used to describe real-life phenomena. The one thing we need to add is that atoms have several resonant frequencies – even an atom with only one electron, like hydrogen ! In addition, we’ll usually want to take into account the fact that a ‘material’ actually consists of various chemical substances, so that’s another reason to consider more than one resonant frequency. The formula is easily derived from our first formula (see the previous post), when we assumed there was only one resonant frequency. Indeed, when we have Nk electrons per unit of volume, whose natural frequency is ωk and whose damping factor is γk, then we can just add the contributions of all oscillators and write:

Formula 7

The index described by this formula yields the following curve:

Several resonant frequencies

So we have a curve with a positive slope, and a value n > 1, for most frequencies, except for a very small range of ω’s for which the slope is negative, and for which the index of refraction has a value n < 1. As Feynman notes, these ω’s– and the negative slope – is sometimes referred to as ‘anomalous’ dispersion but, in fact, there’s nothing ‘abnormal’ about it.

The interesting thing is the iγkω term in the denominator, i.e. the imaginary component of the index, and how that compares with the (real) “resonance term” ωk2– ω2. If the resonance term becomes very small compared to iγkω, then the index will become almost completely imaginary, which means that the absorption effect becomes dominant. We can see that effect in the spectrum of light that we receive from the sun: there are ‘dark lines’, i.e. frequencies that have been strongly absorbed at the resonant frequencies of the atoms in the Sun and its ‘atmosphere’, and that allows us to actually tell what the Sun’s ‘atmosphere’ (or that of other stars) actually consists of.      

So… There we are. I am aware of the fact that this has been the longest post of all I’ve written. I apologize. But so it’s quite complete now. The only piece that’s missing is something on energy and, perhaps, some more detail on these electron oscillators. But I don’t think that’s so essential. It’s time to move on to another topic, I think.

Euler’s spiral

When talking diffraction, one of the more amusing curves is the curve showing the intensity of light near the edge of a shadow. It is shown below.

Fig 30-9

Light becomes more intense as we move away from the edge, then it overshoots (so it is brighter than further away), then the intensity wobbles and oscillates, to finally ‘settle’ at the intensity of the light elsewhere.

How do we get a curve like that? We get it through another amusing curve: the Cornu spiral (which was re-named as the Euler spiral for some reason I don’t understand), which we’ve encountered also when adding probability amplitudes. Let me first depict the ‘real’ situation below: we have an opaque object AB, so no light goes through AB itself. However, the light that goes past it, casts a shadow on a screen, which is denoted as QPR here. And so the curve above shows the intensity of the light near the edge of that shadow.

Fig 30-7

The first weird thing to note is what I said about diffraction of light through a slit (or a hole – in somewhat less respectful language) in my previous post: the diffraction patterns can be explained if we assume that there are sources distributed, with uniform density, across the open holes. This is a deep mystery, which I’ll attempt to explain later. As for now, I can only state what Feynman has to say about it: “Of course, actually there are no sources at the holes. In fact, that is the only place that there are certainly no sources. Nevertheless, we get the correct diffraction pattern by considering the holes to be the only places where there are sources.”

So we do the same here. We assume that we have a series of closely spaced ‘antennas’, or sources, starting from B, up to D, E, C and all the way up to infinity, and so we need to add the contributions – or the waves – from these sources to calculate the intensity at all of the points on the screen. Let’s start with the (random) point P. P defines the inflection point D: we’ll say the phase there is zero (because we can, of course, choose our point in time so as to make it zero). So we’ll associate the contribution from D with a tiny vector (an infinitesimal vector) with angle zero. That is shown below: it’s the ‘flat’ (horizontal) vector pointing straight east at the very center of this so-called Cornu spiral.

Fig 30-8

Now, in the neighborhood of D, i.e. just below or above point D, the phase difference will be very small, because the distance from those points near D to P will not differ much from the distance between D and P (i.e. the distance DP). However, as h increases, the phase difference will become larger and larger, it will not increase linearly with h but, because of the geometry involved, the path difference – and, hence, the phase difference (remember – from the previous post – that the phase difference was the product of the wave number and the difference in distance) will increase proportionally with the square of h. In fact, using similar triangles once again, we can easily show that this path difference EF can be approximated by EF ≈ h2/s. However, don’t lose sleep if you wouldn’t manage to figure that out. 🙂

The point to note is that, when you look at that spiral above, the angle of each vector that we’re adding, increases more and more, so that’s why we get a spiral, and not a polygon in a circle, such as the one we encountered in our previous post: the phase differences there were linearly proportional and, hence, each vector added a constant angle to the previous one. Likewise, if we go down from D, to the edge B, the angles will decrease. Of course, if we’re adding contributions to get the amplitude or intensity for point P, we will not get any contributions from points below B. The last (or, I should say, the first) contribution that we get is denoted by the vector BP on that spiral curve, so if we want to get the total contribution, then we have to start adding vectors from there. [Don’t worry: you’ll understand why the other vectors, ‘down south’, are there in a few minutes.]

So we start from BP and go all the way… Well… You see that, once, we’re ‘up north’, in the center of the upper-most spiral, we’re not adding much anymore, because the additional vectors are just sharply changing direction and going round and round and round. In short, most of the contribution to the amplitude of the resultant vector BP∞ is given by points near D. Now, we have chosen point P randomly, and you can easily see from that Cornu spiral that the amplitude, or the intensity rather (which is the square of the amplitude) of that vector BP∞, increases initially, to reach some maximum, depending upon where P is located above B, but then it falls and oscillates indeed, producing the curve with which we started this post.

OK. […] So what else do we have here? Well… That Cornu spiral also shows how we should add arrows to get the intensity at point Q. We’d be adding arrows in the upper-most spiral only and, hence, we would not get much of a total contribution as a result. That’s what marked by vector BQ. On the other hand, if we’d be adding contributions to calculate the intensity at a point much higher than P, i.e. R, then we’d be using pretty much all of the arrows, down from the spiral ‘south’ all the way up to the spiral ‘north’. So that’s BR obviously and, as you can see, most of the contribution comes, once again, from points near D, so that’s the points near the edge. [So now you know why we have an infinite number of arrows in both directions: we need to be able to calculate the intensity from any point on the screen really, below or above P.]

OK. What else? Well… Nothing. This is it really − for the moment that is. Just note that we’re not adding probability amplitudes here (unlike what we did a couple of months ago). We’re adding vectors representing something real here: electric field vectors. [As for how ‘real’ they are: I’ll entertain you about that later. :-)]

This was rather short, isn’t it? I hope you liked it because… Well… What will follow is actually much more boring, because it involves a lot more formulas. However, these formulas will help us get where we want to get, and that is to understand – somehow, if only from a classical perspective – why that empty space acts like an array of electromagnetic radiation sources.

Indeed, when everything is said and done, that’s the deep mystery of light really. Really really deep.